Saturday, August 30, 2008

The Pennsylvania Railroad in Pictures - Part 4

The Saturday Morning Post continues today with Part 4 of a six part series of John Dziobko Jr. Pennsylvania Railroad photographs.

John Dziobko Jr. was born in Newark, N.J., October 10, 1932. His facination with trains began at age 5 when he would go on train trips to see family in West Islip, Long Island, NY. His father took him to various rail operations in the Newark area in the late '30s, where he acquired a fondness for the Pennsylvania Railroad steam engines, and was where he saw his first diesel locomotive in 1943. He began travelling to photograph trains while still in high school at age 17. Back in those days a railfan could ride the train to various rail locations, since there were many more trains and routes at the time.

John's book "The Pennsy in the 1950's..The Last Great Decade" is available in hardcover from The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society.

Pennsylvania Railroad Baldwin RF-16 at the PRR engine facility - Renovo, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1956. Locomotive No. PRR 9701. A hungry shark waiting for work on a muggy August day.

Pennsylvania Railroad EMD F3(A) on the PRR mainline - Altoona, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 9684. Pennsy power waits it out at Altoona.

Pennsylvania Railroad GG-1 at the PRR Elizabeth station - Elizabeth, New Jersey, February 14, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 4893. An immaculate GG-1 leads a train by the platform at Elizabeth on Valentines Day '53.

Pennsylvania Railroad - Woodbridge, New Jersey, February 07, 1951. On February 6, 1951, the PRR's "Broker" derailed at speed on a temporary trestle killing 85 and injuring 500 in one of the worst ever rail accidents in America. This picture was taken the day after the accident from street level.

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam 2-8-0 on the PRR mainline - Altoona, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 3778. A June day in 1953 at Altoona, near the depot in this view. Pennsy started using 2-8-0's in freight service in 1875.

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam 2-10-0 on the Shamoken Branch - Crowl, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1956. Locomotive No. PRR 4390. Pennsy 4390 takes on water at Crowl. The Shamokin branch ran 27 miles from the Susquehanna at Sunbury, PA., to an interchange with the Lehigh Valley at Mt. Carmel, PA., and saw a lot of ore moves.

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam 4-8-2 on the PRR mainline - Altoona, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 6768. Before it pulls, Mountain 6768 poses with its made up train in a pastel-like scene.

Here is a link to Part 1 of the John Dziobko Jr. PRR photographs.

Here is a link to Part 2 of the John Dziobko Jr. PRR photographs.

Here is a link to Part 3 of the John Dziobko Jr. PRR photographs.

Many thanks go out to Ray Peacock for his assistance in making these posts possible. Please visit Ray's site at heartlandrails.com and John's website in process at godfatherrails.com.

Friday, August 29, 2008

Fruit & Vegetable Crate Labels - Pinup Art

On Rush Selected Vegetables - F.H. Hogue Co. - Yuma, Arizona - Firebaugh, California.

Flo Indian River Citrus - Oak Hill Citrus Growers Association - Oak Hill, Florida.

Blushing Vegetables - F.H. Hogue Co. - Yuma, Arizona - Firebaugh, California.

Plenti Grand Selected Vegetables - J. (Bud) Vukasovich Co. - Main Office, Watsonville, California.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Los Angeles Historic Buildings - 1960

The following photographs are from the Historic American Buildings Survey collection at the Library of Congress. (Jack E. Boucher, Photographer October, 1960)

The Bradbury Building, 304 South Broadway - Built in 1893, it is a fine example of multi-story structure designed around an inner glazed court, with splendid art nouveau iron work in open stairways, open elevator cages and balcony rails.

Union Market, 1530-1536 West Sixth Street - Built in 1933, Carl's Market (aka Union Market) is one of a series of "supermarkets" designed by Morgan, Walls & Clements. Essentially all of these were utilitarian buildings with a sculptural sign and street facade.

The Bunker Hill District, Temple, Fifth, Hill, & Fiqueroa Streets, was developed during the first waves of real-estate speculation and boom that came with the extension of Southern Pacific Railroad to LA in 1876, and the construction of the Santa Fe Railway, completed in 1886.

The Plaza Fire House, 126 Plaza Street - Built in 1884, the Plaza Firehouse was the first building to be constructed by the City of Los Angeles for housing fire fighting equipment and personnel. The City Council hired architect William Boring to design the structure which was built by Dennis Hennessy.

The Richfield Oil Building, 555 South Flower Street - Built in 1929, it is an excellent example of the "Modern Style" of the 1920's, a short-lived heroic style with roots in late Art Nouveau and German Expressionism with emphasis on masses rather than volumes. Demolition of the building was begun in November, 1968.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Vintage 1930's New York City Poster Stamps

The Statue of Liberty was presented to the United States by the people of France in 1886. Standing on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. The copper-clad statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, commemorates the centennial of the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence.

The Hippodrome Theatre stood in New York City from 1905 to 1939 in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan. It was called the world's largest theatre by its builders and seated 6,000 people. The Hippodrome was built by Frederick Thompson and Elmer Dundy, creators of the Luna Park amusement park at Coney Island.

Grand Central Terminal (popularly called Grand Central Station) is located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Built in 1913 by the New York Central Railroad, it is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms: 44, with 67 tracks along them.

The Equitable Building is a 36-story office building in New York City, located at 120 Broadway in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. A landmark engineering achievement as a skyscraper, it was designed by Ernest R. Graham and completed in 1915. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978.

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

"WINGS" Starring Clara Bow

Clara Bow was born in Brooklyn, New York on July 29th, 1907. She was an American actress, who rose to fame in the silent film era of the 1920s and became known around the world as "The It girl".

In 1927 she starred in Wings, a war picture largely rewritten to accommodate her, as she was Paramount's biggest star at the time.


Wings is a silent movie about World War I fighter pilots, directed by William Wellman and released by Paramount Pictures. And also starred Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Richard Arlen, with Gary Cooper in a scene which helped launch his career in Hollywood.

Wings was completed at a cost of $2 million, a then unheard of amount of money for a film. The film was written by John Monk Saunders, Louis D. Lighton and Hope Loring, with an original orchestral score by John Stepan Zamecnik, which was uncredited.

Wings went on to win the first Academy Award for Best Picture and also won a second Academy Award for Engineering Effects. The original Paramount release was color tinted and had some sequences in an early widescreen process known as Magnascope. Some prints had synchronized sound effects and music, using the General Electric Kinegraphone (later RCA Photophone) process.

Wings was an immediate success, premiering on August 12th, 1927 at the Critereo Theatre in New York and playing 63 weeks before being moved to second-run theaters. One of the reasons for its resounding popularity was the public infatuation with aviation in the wake of Charles Lindbergh's transatlantic flight.

For many years, Wings was considered a "lost" film until a surviving print was found in the Cinémathèque Française film archive and quickly copied to safety film stock. It was again shown in theaters, including some with Wurlitzer pipe organs.

Clara Bow died on September 27th, 1965. For her contributions to the motion picture industry, she was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and in 1994 she was honored with an image on a United States postage stamp designed by caricaturist Al Hirschfeld.

Here is the "Wings" movie summary at Dr. Macro's High Quality Movie Scans.

Monday, August 25, 2008

20,000 Leagues At Disneyland Paris

If you would like to see over 25 incredibly beautiful wallpaper size pictures of the 20,000 Leagues Walk-Thru exhibit at Disneyland Paris from the "Disney and more" Blog just click on the picture below.

Saturday, August 23, 2008

The Pennsylvania Railroad in Pictures - Part 3

The Saturday Morning Post continues today with Part 3 of a six part series of John Dziobko Jr. Pennsylvania Railroad photographs.

John Dziobko Jr. was born in Newark, N.J., October 10, 1932. His facination with trains began at age 5 when he would go on train trips to see family in West Islip, Long Island, NY. His father took him to various rail operations in the Newark area in the late '30s, where he acquired a fondness for the Pennsylvania Railroad steam engines, and was where he saw his first diesel locomotive in 1943. He began travelling to photograph trains while still in high school at age 17. Back in those days a railfan could ride the train to various rail locations, since there were many more trains and routes at the time.

John's book "The Pennsy in the 1950's..The Last Great Decade" is available in hardcover from The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society.

Pennsylvania Railroad Baldwin BP60 at the PRR Altoona station - Altoona, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1951. Locomotive No. PRR 5816. Trailing power on #13, a no name mail train to St. Louis, is BP60 #5816. Ahead, Horseshoe Curve and the climb over the mountain.

Pennsylvania Railroad BLW E3b at the PRR Meadows Engine Terminal - Kearny, New Jersey, May 02, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 4995. Another incredible flashback to the way it was from John's camera.

Pennsylvania Railroad EMD E8(A) at 18th Street - Chicago, Illinois, June 01, 1959. Locomotive No. PRR 5703. A pair of E units in Chicago, awaiting their next assignment. For more of John's classic PRR color images, see "The Pennsy in the 1950's..The Last Great Decade" available in hardcover from the PRRT&HS.

Pennsylvania Railroad Shops - Altoona, Pennsylvania, Thursday June 11, 1953 was a workday and the Altoona shops were alive with activity.

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam 2-8-0 on the PRR mainline - Altoona, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1953. Locomotive No. PRR 3778. One of the great paradoxes in RR history is that The Standard Railroad of the World had no standard locomotive numbering scheme. Few numbers on the PRR were unique to one locomotive type or class (with a few exceptions later on). Such was the case with Consolodation 2-8-0 3778 as it lumbers by on the main.

Pennsylvania Railroad Steam 2-10-0 at the PRR engine facility - Altoona, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1956. Locomotive No. PRR 4650. 123 of these brutes were built at Altoona, the last one worked until 1957.

Pennsylvania Railroad 4-8-2 Steam train at the PRR Middle Division MP 85.1 - Mt. Union, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1951. Locomotive No. PRR 6903. Pennsy N5 cabin car #477790 brings up the markers on the rear of a westbound empty reefer block. The ever vigilant eyes of the rear brakeman peer out the cabin window in an era prior to automated talking defect detectors & EOT telemetry devices. The PRR was technologically advanced compared to some roads, with AM radiophone communication to the head end. That's the funky antenna on the rooftop.

Pennsylvania Railroad GG-1 at the PRR yard - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, December 30, 1956. Locomotive No. PRR 4769. P5A 4769 poses with a GG1, steam generator working.

Here is a link to Part 1 of the John Dziobko Jr. PRR photographs.
Here is a link to Part 2 of the John Dziobko Jr. PRR photographs.

Many thanks go out to Ray Peacock for his assistance in making these posts possible. Please visit Ray's site at heartlandrails.com and John's website in process at godfatherrails.com.

Thursday, August 21, 2008

Harrah's Reno & Lake Tahoe - 1960's Postcards

Harrah's Club, Reno, 210 North Virginia Street. Gambling, top lounge attractions 24 hours daily, and prevailing friendliness make Harrah's Club one of the West's favorite clubs. Visit Harrah's, Lake Tahoe, too, featuring the top names in show business.

Harrah's Club, Reno... in the heart of the greatest little city in the world. Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Internationally known, Reno has become an all-year sports center for the fun-loving.

Harrah's ... 210 No. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada and Lake Tahoe on Highway 50, Stateline, Nev. Both Clubs are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year in the heart of America's most beautiful vacation land.

Harrah's Club ... in Reno at 210 No. Virginia, at Lake Tahoe on Highway 50, Stateline Nevada.Both Clubs are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year in America's most beautiful vacation land.

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Harrah's Reno & Lake Tahoe - 1960's Postcards

Harrah's Club, Lake Tahoe. Easily reached from California and Nevada cities on scenic Highway 50. Open all year.



Harrah's and Harrah's Bingo in Reno, both in the heart of the city... At Stateline, Lake Tahoe, on Highway 50. Tahoe Harrah's features the 700 seat South Shore Room, theatre-restaurant, plus two 24 hour restaurants. Harrah's facilities are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Ziegfeld Follies Beauties

What Makes A "Ziegfeld Girl" by Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. from the New York Morning Telegraph 1925.

Beauty, of course, is the most important requirement and the paramount asset of the applicant. When I say that, I mean beauty of face, form, charm and manner, personal magnetism, individuality, grace and poise. These are details that must always be settled before the applicant has demonstrated her ability either to sing or dance. It is not easy to pass the test that qualifies a girl for membership in a Ziegfeld production, but I am frank to say that once she has done so, much of the element of doubt is removed so far as the future success of her career before the footlights is concerned.

There is a prevalent impression that once a girl is enlisted under the Ziegfeld standard, her troubles are over and her hard work is ended. What a mistake! Let us hope that for many it does mean the end of trouble so far as earning a livelihood is concerned, that it means happy and comfortable home living honestly earned. But there are other troubles ahead for her, and plenty of hard work.


Myrna Darby performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1927.

A Ziegfeld production is no place for a drone or an idler. Often are the times when you who read these words are just opening your eyes in the morning or are enjoying your breakfast and the early news of the day, that the girls of a Ziegfeld production are busy as bees on the stage of an empty theatre, if indeed they have not already put in an hour or more in striving to come nearer to perfection in that which is expected of them before the footlights. Yes, there is plenty of hard work for them in addition to that which they do when they appear, smiling and happy, when the curtain goes up. Giving a performance is the least of their worries.


Bea Ackerman performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1923/24.

How little the public realizes what a girl must go through before she finally appears before the spotlight that is thrown upon the stage. How few there are who succeed from the many who seek this method of earning a livelihood. And, I may add, from what totally unexpected sources come many of those who from the comparatively modest beginning in the chorus rise to the heights of really great achievement in the theatrical profession.


Dorothy Flood performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931.

I venture the assertion that there is not one honest, wholesome walk of life from which they have not come to some one of the numerous Ziegfeld productions. The society girl, tired of that life, the school teacher wearied with the duties of her daily grind, the one whose life has heretofore been devoid of purpose, the stenographer, cashier or even the waitress. Maybe she is a chambermaid, but if she has the necessary talent and qualities a place awaits her in the Ziegfeld ranks.


Ruth Etting performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1927/31.

Let us grant that a girl qualifies for one of my productions. It is interesting to note what follows. First, it is clearly outlined to her what she is expected to do. She may be impressed at the outset that the impossible is required, but honest application and heroic perseverance on her part plus skillful and encouraging direction by experts very seldom fail to achieve the desired results. But it is only through constant, faithful endeavor by the girl herself that the goal eventually is reached.


Helen Henderson performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1923/25.

It is not the work of a fortnight, a month or several months to train these girls for the work expected of them. It is the task of several months and it is a fact that a girl, either while rehearsing or actually playing, may be training for some character or feature in some future production not yet definitely fixed even in my own mind. Of course, she is also doing this without knowledge herself of the fact.


Katherine Burke performed in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1925/31.

To illustrate what I mean, an apt dancer may be in thorough unison with the others in that particular group, and at the same time reveal a difference in dancing temperament, rhythm or technique; she may phrase, accentuate or actually interpret differently. Not only may she unconsciously register a favorable impression with my associates and me, but she may also suggest something by her work that will lead to some new and novel feature in a forthcoming production.

Photographs by Alfred Cheney Johnston. For more pictures and information on The Ziegfeld Girls, here is a link to a fantastic website called "Historical Ziegfeld."