Saturday, February 28, 2009

LIFE Covers The 60's

Mr. and and Mrs. John F. Kennedy
after he won the Presidential election.
November 21, 1960 - Photographer: Paul Schutzer.

Astronaut John Glenn "Making of a Brave Man"
February 02, 1962 - Photographer: Ralph Morse.

Actress Natalie Wood at the
Cannes Film Festival in France.
June 15, 1962 - Photographer: Paul Schutzer.

Widow and son of murdered civil rights
activist Medgar Evers at his funeral.
June 28, 1963 - Photographer: John Loengard.

Senator Barry Goldwater with horse "Sunny"
November 1, 1963 - Photographer: Leonard McCombe.

Boxer Cassius Clay aka Mohammed Ali
June 06, 1964 - Photographer: Bob Gomel.

The Beatles - Ringo Starr, George Harrison,
Paul McCartney and John Lennon.
August 28, 1964 - Photographer: John Dominis.

Entertainer Frank Sinatra.
April 23, 1965 - Photographer: John Dominis.

American Pan Am stewardess Susan Sicari embracing
Russian Aeroflot Stewardess on the re-opening of the
New York to Moscow direct airline route.
July 26, 1968 - Photographer: Arthur Schatz.

Tennis player Arthur Ashe.
September 20, 1968 - Photographer: Richard Meek.

President Richard Nixon in Key Biscayne.
February 21, 1969 - Photographer: George Silk.

"Leaving for the Moon" Astronaut Neil Armstrong
July 25, 1969 - Photographer: Leonard McCombe.

LINK: LIFE magazine photo archive

Friday, February 27, 2009

Glen Echo Park - Part 2

Glen Echo Park, also known as Glen Echo Amusement Park and Glen Echo Park Historic District, is a public park and national historic district in Glen Echo, Montgomery County, Maryland. Photos are from the 1920's and are part of National Photo Company archive at the Library of Congress.

Glen Echo Park began in 1891 as a National Chautauqua Assembly and operated as an amusement park until 1968. As of 2007, the park hosts an arts education program and is also known for its antique carousel, its Spanish Ballroom, its historic electric street car and its annual Washington Folk Festival.

The park is near to several notable sites such as the Clara Barton house and the C&O canal. Glen Echo used to be a trolley park accessible by the street car system; the park was designed to be the last stop on the cars so people could go there after work.

The original park had several attractions, including bumper cars, shooting galleries, and an expansive rollercoaster. The park also had a large pool, the Crystal Pool, the remains of which can still be seen today, and a shooting gallery, which was stopped in WWII because of ammunition shortages. (Author: REAL BULLETS FOLKS!)

Glen Echo was restricted to whites for 63 out of 70 years of its history. However, on June 30th, 1960 a group of college students (primarily from Howard University) staged a sit-in protest on the carousel and five African American students were subsequently arrested. As a result, an eleven-week civil rights campaign began. The park opened the doors to all races in the 1961 season.

The surrounding community complained about the influx of urban African Americans. As a result, the trolley and bus service to Glen Echo were closed. Without the public transportation link, Glen Echo, like most small suburban amusement parks, closed in 1968.

Since 1971, the park has been under the watch of the National Park Service. Various renovations have taken place throughout the park, most notably the Spanish Ballroom, the Arcade building that now hosts art classes, and the art deco style opening gates.

The Park Carousel, the last operating park ride, and the highlight of the park today, is a 1921 Dentzel three-row menagerie carousel with 38 horses, 2 chariots, 4 rabbits, 4 ostriches, a lion, a tiger, a giraffe, and a prancing deer.

ADDITIONAL INFO ~ Information provided by Steven Solomon, who is a resident of the neighborhood:

"The surrounding community complained about the influx of urban African Americans. As a result, the trolley and bus service to Glen Echo were closed. Without the public transportation link, Glen Echo, like most small suburban amusement parks, closed in 1968."

That's not accurate - some of the community complained, but in reality, many actually FOUGHT for integration. Specifically, the Bannockburn community across MacArthur Boulevard from Glen Echo was extremely involved in integrating the park.

Additionally, the reason for bus service and trolley service being shut down was no different than anywhere else in the US in that time period - the popularity of the automobile and building of roads decreased ridership to the point that private ownership of the bus service and trolley cars did not make financial sense and they were shut down.

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Glen Echo Park - Part 1

Glen Echo Park, also known as Glen Echo Amusement Park and Glen Echo Park Historic District, is a public park and national historic district in Glen Echo, Montgomery County, Maryland. Photos are from the 1920's and are part of National Photo Company archive at the Library of Congress.

Glen Echo Park began in 1891 as a National Chautauqua Assembly and operated as an amusement park until 1968. As of 2007, the park hosts an arts education program and is also known for its antique carousel, its Spanish Ballroom, its historic electric street car and its annual Washington Folk Festival.

The park is near to several notable sites such as the Clara Barton house and the C&O canal. Glen Echo used to be a trolley park accessible by the street car system; the park was designed to be the last stop on the cars so people could go there after work.

The original park had several attractions, including bumper cars, shooting galleries, and an expansive rollercoaster. The park also had a large pool, the Crystal Pool, the remains of which can still be seen today, and a shooting gallery, which was stopped in WWII because of ammunition shortages. (Author: REAL BULLETS FOLKS!)

Glen Echo was restricted to whites for 63 out of 70 years of its history. However, on June 30th, 1960 a group of college students (primarily from Howard University) staged a sit-in protest on the carousel and five African American students were subsequently arrested. As a result, an eleven-week civil rights campaign began. The park opened the doors to all races in the 1961 season.

The surrounding community complained about the influx of urban African Americans. As a result, the trolley and bus service to Glen Echo were closed. Without the public transportation link, Glen Echo, like most small suburban amusement parks, closed in 1968.

Since 1971, the park has been under the watch of the National Park Service. Various renovations have taken place throughout the park, most notably the Spanish Ballroom, the Arcade building that now hosts art classes, and the art deco style opening gates.

The Park Carousel, the last operating park ride, and the highlight of the park today, is a 1921 Dentzel three-row menagerie carousel with 38 horses, 2 chariots, 4 rabbits, 4 ostriches, a lion, a tiger, a giraffe, and a prancing deer.

Part 2 of the Glen Echo Amusement Park, Tomorrow.

ADDITIONAL INFO ~ Information provided by Steven Solomon, who is a resident of the neighborhood:

"The surrounding community complained about the influx of urban African Americans. As a result, the trolley and bus service to Glen Echo were closed. Without the public transportation link, Glen Echo, like most small suburban amusement parks, closed in 1968."

That's not accurate - some of the community complained, but in reality, many actually FOUGHT for integration. Specifically, the Bannockburn community across MacArthur Boulevard from Glen Echo was extremely involved in integrating the park.

Additionally, the reason for bus service and trolley service being shut down was no different than anywhere else in the US in that time period - the popularity of the automobile and building of roads decreased ridership to the point that private ownership of the bus service and trolley cars did not make financial sense and they were shut down.

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Seattle Transit - 1890's

The Rainier Power and Railway Company 1891.

Guy Phinney's private trolley, 1891.

Capitol Hill electric trolley, 1890s.

Green Lake trolley, 1896.

LINK: Seattle Municipal Archives on Flickr.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Advertising Postcards

For our new generation of Westerners the California Brewing Company of San Francisco brews California Gold Label Beer. Its light, appealing taste truly captures the authentic "Flavor of the West." (circa 1960's)

Visitors are welcome at Whitaker Park, the largest cigarette factory in the world. The R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company invites you to Winston-Salem, N.C., where you can enjoy free and personalized tours. (circa 1960's)

Pauker's Official Roy Rogers Sweaters - Made To Take Abuse, 100% Pure Wool - Slipovers #3.98, Coat Sweaters $4.98 - Nationally advertised in Life, Parents and Good Housekeeping magazines. (circa late 1950's)

Deninger's 932 Broad St., 33 Court St., Bridgeport, Connecticut - At your service in the same spot for 25 years - Phone 3-0151 for Thibaut Wallpapers, Hilo Products, Dutch Boy Paints and Venetian Blinds. (circa 1952)

Smokey Bear says: Outdoor recreation is one of the many resources that are destroyed by forest fires. Please, won't you be extra careful! - Iowa Conservation Commission. (circa 1966)

Monday, February 23, 2009

Hamburger Airplanes

  • McDonalds began in 1940, with a restaurant opened by brothers Dick and Mac McDonald in San Bernardino, California. Their introduction of the "Speedee Service System" in 1948 established the principles of the modern fast-food restaurant.

  • An American tradition now known the world over, McDonald's Corporation is the world's largest chain of fast food restaurants, serving nearly 58 million customers daily. Their logo's adorn many airplanes around the world.

    McDonald's - Douglas DC-3 - Taupo, New Zealand, October 19, 2006. (Photo by: Eduard Brantjes / Airliners.Net)

    Ronald McDonald - Antonov An-2R - Budapest, Hungary, April 18, 2003. (Photo by: Jorgos Tsambikakis / Airliners.Net)

    Crossair - McDonnell Douglas MD-83 (DC-9-83) - Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 1997. (Photo by: Javier Rodriguez / Airliners.Net)

    Austrian Airlines - Airbus A321-111 - Vienna, Austria, February 3, 2008. (Photo by: Thomas Ernst / Airliners.Net)

    McPlane - Groningen, Netherlands taken by yours truly in 1972.
  • Sunday, February 22, 2009

    Heartland Rails: Electro Motive F7 Diesel

    The HeartlandRails.com post from Viewliner Limited contributor Ray Peacock will be a regular feature on Sunday's and will showcase Ray's great railroad photography. (To visit Heartland Rails just click on the banner.)

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  • The EMD F7 was a 1,500 horsepower diesel electric locomotive produced between February 1949 and December 1953 by the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors (EMD) and General Motors Diesel (GMD).

  • Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant or GMD's London, Ontario facility. Although originally promoted as a freight-hauling unit by EMD, the F7 was also used in passenger service hauling such trains as the Santa Fe's El Capitan.

  • A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A-units and 1,483 cabless booster or B-units were built. The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F-unit locomotives, and by far the highest-selling cab unit of all time.

    Ohio Central Railroad - McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania, August, 2002 - A couple of rarities at the Ohio Central facility in McKee's Rocks. Kind of stumbled upon this RR environment on a railfan trip to Pittsburgh.

    Wisconsin & Southern Railroad - Madison, Wisconsin, February 02, 2000 - WSOR's covered wagon fleet included this F unit, since sold. Here it sits in the late afternoon chill of a February day waiting for the call to work.

    Canadian Pacific Railway - Town of Fountain Prairie, Wisconsin, May 05, 2003 - Returning west to Calgary from the Kentucky Derby, CP's RCP nears CTC Dodge West and single track.

    Chicago & North Western Railroad - Evanston, Illinois, April, 1987 - he CNW executive train heads towards Wisconsin in the first light of the day. Could the slicing and dicing of the Wis. Div. be on the agenda???

    Wisconsin & Southern Railroad - Madison, Wisconsin, March 07, 2000 - Even though they still maintain an assortment of passenger equipment and a couple vintage E's, all of the equipment seen here has been disposed of by the WSOR.
  • Thursday, February 19, 2009

    LIFE Covers Vietnam

    Camouflaged U.S. soldier training for jungle fighting in Vietnam - October 27, 1961 - Photographer: Ralph Morse.

    Helicopter crew chief James C. Farley (L) with jammed machine gun shouting to crew as wounded pilot Lt. James Magel lies dying beside him - April 16, 1965 - Photographer: Larry Burrows.

    Wounded U.S. Marine being helped to safety by his buddies during fire fight with Vietcong - July 02, 1965 - Photographer: Bill Eppridge.

    "The Fleet Lashes Out" with USS Oklahoma shelling the Vietcong off Vietnam - August 06, 1965 - Photographer: Bill Ray.

    "Vietnam: A Searching Assessment" - Over South Vietnam, U.S. jet fighters fly a mission at dawn - February 25, 1966 - Photographer: Larry Burrows.

    President Lyndon Johnson at Cam Rahn Bay in to Vietnam, General Westmoreland in the foreground - November 04, 1966 - Photographer: George Silk.

    U.S. Navy presence on the Mekong River during Vietnam War - January 13, 1967 - Photographer: Larry Burrows.

    American paratroopers of the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade in the air during Operation Junction City, a daytime combat drop during the Vietnam War - March 10, 1967 - Photographer: Co Rentmeester.